Introduction

 

More
than 1,000 days have passed since the Israeli Occupation Forces (IOF) tightened
the comprehensive closure imposed on the Gaza Strip. During this 1,000-day period, civilians in
the Gaza Strip have lived under increasingly harsh conditions resulting from
restrictions imposed on all border crossings of the Gaza Strip, both those used
for the movement of persons and those used for imports and exports providing
for the basic needs of the civilian population. 

 

The
policy of complete siege has not only violated the right to freedom of movement
of individuals, but also impacted the supply of food and medicine required for
the daily life of more than 1.5 million civilians living in the Gaza
Strip. Similarly affected are civilian
supplies of fuel, cooking gas, construction materials and raw materials
required for various economic sectors, including industry, agriculture,
transportation and tourism. As a part of
this policy of closure, a total ban has been imposed on the export of any
agricultural, industrial and commercial products from the Gaza Strip. 

 

These
IOF measures are reflected in the imposition of a policy of collective
punishment of the civilian population in the Gaza Strip, prohibited under
international humanitarian law and international human rights law. This pattern constitutes a prohibited policy
of victimizing civilians by depriving them of their private living resources. Various aspects of human life have
deteriorated catastrophically as a result. Poverty and unemployment rates in the Gaza Strip have reached
unprecedented levels, registering 80% and 60% respectively. 

 

During
he reporting period, IOF closed all of the Gaza Strip’s border crossings used
for the movement of persons and imposed additional restrictions on the movement
from and to the Gaza Strip. Since 12
June 2007, Rafah International Crossing Point on the Egyptian border has been
completely closed on 945 days, and was partially opened on 60 days – in some
cases, only in one direction. The
population of the Gaza Strip has suffered as a result of the closure of Rafah
International Crossing Point for the movement of passengers traveling from and
to Gaza. Hundreds of Palestinian
families living abroad and Palestinians working in foreign countries have been
affected. Hundreds of Gazan patients,
especially those suffering from cancer and heart disease, suffered while
waiting for the crossing point to be opened so they could travel for medical treatment
in Egyptian hospitals or abroad or to return to Gaza. Additionally, thousands of Gazan students,
including those who had completed their secondary school education and wished
to study abroad, were denied the possibility of enrolling at universities abroad or were prevented from reaching their
universities on time. The closure of
Rafah International Crossing Point has resulted the disruption of the work of
many Palestinians who work in governmental, non-governmental or private
institutions, especially those who have activities to be implemented
abroad. On the other hand, during the
partial opening of the crossing point, limited numbers of passengers – mostly
patients and their escorts who were traveling to receive treatment in hospitals
in Egyptian and abroad; students enrolled in international universities and
holders of foreign visas, residency permits and nationalities

 

 

 


were allowed to travel via Rafah International Crossing Point.

 

Beit
Hanoun (Erez) crossing has been completely closed for Gazan civilians wishing
to travel to the West Bank and/or Israel since 15 June 2007, immediately
following Hamas’ takeover of the Gaza Strip. Since then, IOF have permitted only specific categories of people to
travel via Beit Hanoun crossing, often under very complicated procedures and
degrading treatment. These groups include Gazan patients suffering very serious
conditions, foreign journalists, employees of international humanitarian
organizations, and those wishing to travel via al-Karama International Crossing
Point (Allenby Bridge). The period since
June 2007 also marked a sharp decline in the numbers of patients allowed to
travel via the crossing. The number of
patients permitted to travel via the crossing was, at best, 50% of the number
of patients who were allowed to travel via the crossing during the first half
of 2006. Approximately 900 Gazan
prisoners in Israeli jails have been continuously denied their visitation
rights for over two and a half years.

 

For
the same time period, IOF have imposed very severe restrictions on all
commercial crossings of the Gaza Strip and have imposed a total ban on the
export of the Gaza Strip’s products. Only limited quantities of flowers and strawberries were allowed to be
exported, but their numbers did not exceed 20% and 4%, respectively, of the
quantities prepared for transport. It
should be noted that according to data provided by the Agricultural
Cooperative Association of Strawberry, Vegetable and Flower Farmers
,
the Gaza Strip produces approximately 60 million flowers and 1,500 tons of
strawberries for export every year. 

 

IOF
took new measures aimed at making Karm Abu Salem (Kerem Shalom) crossing,
southeast of Rafah, the main crossing of the Gaza Strip in spite of its limited
operational capacity (it is not equipped to receive all supplies necessary to
cover the needs of the civilian population of the Gaza Strip). On 15 June 2007, IOF completely closed Sofa
crossing, which has been used for the delivery of construction materials. Some humanitarian aid consignments were
allowed into the Gaza Strip via Sofa crossing until November 2008, when the
crossing was completely closed. The
limited quantities of humanitarian aid that had been permitted into the Gaza
Strip via Sofa crossing were shifted to Karm Abu Salem crossing. 

 

Further,
IOF have impeded the operations at Nahal Oz crossing, which was used for the
delivery of fuel supplies to the Gaza Strip. IOF have reduced fuel supplies to Gaza to minimal levels that do not
meet the minimum needs of the civilian population. In a later development, on 4 January 2010,
IOF completely closed Nahal Oz crossing and transferred the limited quantities
of fuel supplies to the Gaza Strip to Karm Abu Salem crossing, which is not
equipped to receive sufficient amounts to meet the daily needs of the Gaza
Strip, especially in cooking gas. 

 

IOF
have also impeded the operation at al-Mentar (Karni) crossing, which is the
largest and most equipped crossing in the Gaza Strip. The daily capacity of al-Mentar crossing is
approximately 400 truckloads and 75% of Gaza’s needs used to be delivered
through the crossing. Since 13 June
2007, the crossing has been completely closed on 747 days and has been
partially opened on 258 for the delivery of wheat and fodders via a conveyor
belt. The continued closure of al-Mentar
crossing has resulted in the deterioration of the humanitarian conditions of
the approximately 1.5 million civilians living in the Gaza Strip.

 

 

Turning
Karm Abu Salem crossing, which is not equipped for commercial purposes because
its capacity is limited, into the main crossing of the Gaza Strip has increased
the suffering of the civilian population. Before the imposition of the total siege on the Gaza Strip, 450
truckloads were allowed into the Gaza Strip per day, while during the reporting
period, less than 75 truckloads were allowed into the Gaza Strip daily.

 

The
suffering of civilians, who have faced numerous consecutive crises, was
aggravated because of the lack of basic items and utilities, such as cooking gas,
electrical power and construction materials, including cement, iron bars and
aggregate, which are required to reconstruct and repair residential houses and
civilian establishments destroyed during the siege and especially during the
latest Israeli offensive. The ban
imposed on the delivery of construction materials constitutes an obstacle to
local and international efforts exerted to reconstruct the Gaza Strip although
more than 14 months have passed since the end of the most recent full-scale
offensive on the Gaza Strip. 

 

The following is a summary of the most significant developments relevant
to Gaza’s border crossings during the 44-day reporting period (16 February – 31
March 2010):

 

I. Crossings Used for the Movement
of Persons

 

· Rafah International Crossing Point remained closed during
the reporting period. It was completely
closed on 39 days while it was exceptionally opened on 5 days for limited hours
to allow 4,400 persons to travel via the crossing point. They constituted only
a part of the 7,500 persons who had been registered to travel, most of them
patients, students enrolled in international universities and holders of
foreign visas, residency permits or nationalities. The Egyptian authorities returned to Gaza 900
civilians who did not meet the entry requirements of Egypt. In addition, approximately 2,600 civilians
who were stranded on the Egyptian side of the border were allowed to return to
Gaza. 

· During the reporting period, Beit Hanoun (Erez) crossing was
completely closed for Palestinian civilians wishing to travel to the West Bank
and/or Israel. Only limited categories
of persons were allowed to travel via Beit Hanoun crossing under very
complicated procedures.

· The reporting period marked a sharp decline in the number of
Gazan patients who were allowed to travel via Beit Hanoun crossing; only 1,020
patients (an average of 23 patients daily) were allowed to travel via the
crossing. This marks a 54% decline in
comparison with 2006. 

· Approximately 900 Gazans detained in jails inside Israel
have been continuously denied family visitation for more than 32 months because
of the ongoing ban on the movement of Palestinian civilians via Beit Hanoun
crossing.

 

II. Crossings Used for the Movement
of Goods

 

· During the reporting period, IOF imposed additional
restrictions on all crossings of the Gaza Strip and took further steps to turn
Karm Abu Salem crossing into the main and only crossing of the Gaza Strip. 

 

 

· IOF have completely closed Nahal Oz crossing, which was used
for the delivery of fuel supplies to the Gaza Strip prior to 4 January 2010,
and transferred the quantities of fuel, including cooking gas, which used to be
delivered via Nahal Oz to Karm Abu Salem crossing, which is not equipped to
receive the minimum level of cooking gas needed for the population in Gaza.

· Sofa crossing has remained completely closed and the
delivery of humanitarian aid, which was previously allowed to enter the Gaza
Strip via the crossing, was transferred to Karm Abu Salem crossing more than
one year ago. 

· Al-Mentar (Karni) crossing was either completely closed or
partially opened with very tight restrictions imposed on the materials
permitted into the Gaza Strip. Al-Mentar
crossing is the largest and most important commercial crossing in the Gaza
Strip. It is the best-equipped crossing
for the purpose of transporting goods. During the reporting period, the crossing was completely closed on 33
days while it was partially opened for limited hours on 11 days to allow the
delivery of only wheat and fodders via a conveyor belt. Since 13 June 2007, the crossing has been
completely closed on 747 days. The
closure of al-Mentar crossing has resulted in the deterioration of the humanitarian
conditions in the Gaza Strip and has negatively impacted the lives of civilians. 

· During the reporting period, Karm Abu Salem crossing was
completely closed on 14 days while it was partially opened on 30 days to allow
the delivery of limited quantities of humanitarian aid, basic goods and
fuel. 

 

Following
are the most significant developments related to the Gaza Strip’s border
crossing during the reporting period:

 

· Rafah International Crossing Point:

 

During
the reporting period, Rafah International Crossing Point was completely closed
on 39 days (89%), while it was partially opened on 5 days (11%). Since 12 June 2007, the crossing point has
been completely closed on 945 days. During the partial opening of the crossing point, a number of patients
and their companions were allowed to travel to hospitals in Egypt and abroad
for treatment or return to Gaza after receiving required treatment. Further, a number of students and holders of
foreign visas, residency permits or passports were allowed to travel via the
crossing point. The movement at Rafah
International Crossing Point during the reporting period was as follows:

 

1. Entry and Departure of
Internationals and International Delegations

 

During
the reporting period, the number of the members of international delegations
who were allowed to enter and leave Gaza via Rafah crossing declined
sharply. Only 22 internationals were
allowed to leave Gaza and only seven others were permitted to enter. During the previous reporting period (1
January 2010 – 15 February 2010), the Egyptian authorities allowed
approximately 540 solidarity activists and workers of international
humanitarian organizations to enter Gaza via Rafah International Crossing
Point, while they allowed approximately 620 persons, mostly international
solidarity activists, members of international organizations, doctors and
journalists, to leave Gaza via the crossing point. 

 

 

2. Transfer of Dead Palestinians to
Gaza

 

The
majority of Palestinian patients who were allowed to enter Egypt for medical
treatment in Egyptian hospitals were suffering from incurable diseases and
serious medical conditions. During the
reporting period, 5 Palestinian patients, one woman and four men, died in
Egyptian hospitals in spite of the medical care that was offered provided. The Egyptian authorities made the necessary
arrangements to transfer the deceased to the Gaza Strip via Rafah International
Crossing point.

 

3. Patients Receiving Medical
Treatment Abroad

 

During
the reporting period, the Egyptian authorities allowed approximately 210 Gazan
patients suffering from serious and chronic diseases to enter Egypt in order to
receive medical treatment in Egyptian hospitals during the time the crossing
was officially closed. One escort was
allowed to accompany each patient. Concurrently, Israel has continued to reduce the number of patients from
Gaza who were allowed access hospitals in the West Bank, Jerusalem and Israel
via Beit Hanoun crossing. Gaza’s
hospitals were overcrowded and suffered severe shortages in medicines and
medical supplies. During the reporting period, the Egyptian authorities allowed
approximately 2,100 patients and wounded persons who had completed treatment in
Egyptian hospitals to return to the Gaza Strip in groups during the days of
closure, specifically on Wednesdays and Thursdays, or during the partial
opening of the crossing. 

 

4. Exceptional Opening of Rafah
International Crossing Point for Five Days

 

 On 1 March 2010, 949 Palestinians, who are – patients,
students enrolled at universities abroad and holders of foreign residency
permits – were allowed to leave Gaza via Rafah International Crossing Point. An
additional 267 civilians, patients and their escorts and civilians stranded on
the Egyptian side, were allowed to return to Gaza.

 On 2 March 2010, 905 Palestinians – patients, students
enrolled at universities abroad and holders of foreign residency permits – were
allowed to leave Gaza via the crossing point. A further 232 civilians stranded on the Egyptian side as well as
patients and their escorts were allowed to return to Gaza. On the same day, 292 civilians who did not
meet the requirements to enter Egypt were forced to return to Gaza. 

 On 3 March 2010, 987 Palestinians, who are – patients,
students enrolled at universities abroad and holders of foreign residency
permits – were allowed to leave Gaza via the crossing point while 197 civilians
who did not meet the requirements to enter Egypt were forced to return to Gaza.
An additional 197 civilians stranded on the Egyptian side as well as patients
and their escorts were allowed to return to Gaza.

 On 4 March 2010, 858 Gazan civilians – patients, students
enrolled at universities abroad and holders of foreign residency permits – were
allowed to leave Gaza via the crossing point. On the same day, 121 civilians stranded on the Egyptian side as well as
patients and their escorts, were allowed to enter to Gaza. 213 civilians who
did not meet the requirements to enter Egypt were forced to return to Gaza.

 

 

 

 On 5 March 2010, 668 Gazan civilians – patients, students
enrolled at universities abroad and holders of foreign residency permits – were
allowed to leave Gaza via the crossing point. On the same day, 44 civilians stranded on the Egyptian side as well as
patients and their escorts were allowed to enter to Gaza. 197 civilians who did
not meet the requirements to enter Egypt were forced to return to Gaza.

 

·    Beit Hanoun (Erez) Crossing

 

The
reporting period marked severe restrictions imposed by IOF on the movement of
all categories of persons who were allowed to travel via Beit Hanoun crossing,
including patients suffering from serious medical conditions, international
journalists, employees of international humanitarian organizations and those
wishing to travel via al-Karama International Crossing Point (Allenby Bridge)
on the border with Jordan. During the
reporting period, IOF completely closed Beit Hanoun crossing on 10 days. IOF also significantly reduced the number of
Gazan patients who were allowed to pass through Beit Hanoun crossing during the
reporting period. 

 

The most significant developments relevant to
movement through Beit Hanoun crossing were as follows:

 

 IOF completely closed the crossing for the movement of most
Palestinian civilians throughout the 44-day reporting period. The crossing was completely closed for 10
days for the limited categories who are allowed to travel via the crossing.

 IOF completely closed the crossing on 21 days for
businesspeople. The crossing was opened
on 23 days to allow approximately 78 traders, an average of 3 individuals
daily, to travel via the crossing. This
is a sharp decline in comparison with the number of businesspeople who were
allowed to travel via the crossing six months earlier, when an average of 10
traders daily was allowed to pass through the crossing.

 Patients’ Conditions: IOF completely closed the crossing on
10 days for the movement of Gazan patients who had medical referrals to
hospitals in Israel and/or the West Bank. During the partial opening of the crossing, IOF allowed approximately
1,020 patients to travel via the crossing. This marks a reduction in the daily average number of patients allowed
to travel via the crossing to 23 patients per day. This represents a 54% decrease in numbers
compared to 2006. 

 

 Journalists, Diplomats and Employees of International
Humanitarian Organizations

 

During
the reporting period, IOF imposed a ban on the entry of journalists, media
representatives, diplomats and members of international humanitarian
organizations for 19 days. During the
opening days, IOF allowed approximately 99 journalists, 124 members of diplomatic
missions and 942 members of international humanitarian organizations to enter
Gaza often under very complicated security procedures, resulting in delays of
several days for many of those allowed to enter. 

 

 

 

 

Prisoners’ Visitation Rights

 

For
more than 32 months, IOF have prevented the families of Palestinians from Gazan
detained in Israeli jails from visiting their imprisoned relatives. There are approximately 900 Gazans detained
in Israeli jails, and this denial of family visits, imposed since 6 June 2007,
is a violation of international humanitarian law, particularly the Fourth
Geneva Convention. PCHR notes that 150
of the prisoners from the Gaza Strip had already been deprived of all
visitation rights prior to June 2007. IOF justifies this deprival of visitation rights with security reasons.
The prison visitation program was facilitated by the International Committee of
the Red Cross (ICRC) until it was suspended by Israel. 

 

· Al-Mentar (Karni) Crossing

 

Developments
relevant to al-Mentar Crossing during the Reporting Period:

 

 Al-Mentar crossing was completely closed for imports and
exports to and from the Gaza Strip on 33 days (75% of the reporting
period). The crossing was partially
opened on 11 days (25%) to allow the entry of approximately 465 truckloads
carrying 19,000 tons of grains and approximately 450 truckloads carrying 16,500
tons of fodders.

 Between 13 June 2007, following Hamas’ takeover of the Gaza
Strip, and the end of reporting period, al-Mentar crossing had been completely
closed on 7
47
days. 

 The continued closure of al-Mentar crossing has led to
further deterioration of humanitarian conditions of 1.5 million civilians in
the Gaza Strip.

 

· Nahal Oz Crossing

 

During
the reporting period, IOF completely closed Nahal Oz crossing, which is built
for the delivery of fuel supplies, including benzene, diesel, industrial fuel
and cooking gas. On 4 January 2010, IOF
officially informed the Palestinian side about the total closure of this
crossing. Before taking this decision,
IOF had obstructed the delivery of fuel to Gaza via Nahal Oz crossing and
reduced the delivery of industrial fuel and cooking gas to minimal levels. The Gaza Strip suffered from a severe
shortage of cooking gas as a result; many cooking gas distribution stations
were forced to shut down. The operation
of the Gaza Power Plant was significantly affected due to the severe shortage
of industrial fuel and various areas of the Gaza Strip suffered electrical
power outages. 

 

· Karm Abu Salem (Kerem Shalom) Crossing

 

 During the reporting period, Karm Abu Salem crossing was
partially opened on 30 days (68% of the reporting period), while it was
completely closed on 14 days (32%). PCHR
notes that Karm Abu Salem crossing has been closed on 461 days since 18 August 2008,
the day when the crossing was re-opened and designated by Israel as Gaza’s main
commercial crossing.

 

 

 During the days the crossing was partial opened, IOF allowed
the entry of 3,150 truckloads of humanitarian relief aid, including food,
blankets and medications delivered by international humanitarian aid
organizations including WFP, ICRC, UNRWA, UNICEF and the Humanitarian Aid
Office of the EU. Food items for local
businesses were also allowed into Gaza via the crossing during the time of its
partial opening. 

 IOF allowed the export of 15 truckloads carrying
approximately 2.5 million flowers. During this season, approximately 25 million flowers were given
permission for export. This number
represents less than 50% of flowers produced for export (approximately 60
million flowers annually). IOF also
permitted the export of 40 tons of strawberries during the current season (less
than 3% of strawberries produced for export). According to the Agricultural Cooperative Association of Strawberry,
Vegetable and Flower Farmers, the Gaza Strip produces 1,500 tons of
strawberries for export per year.

 During the complete closure of the crossing, Israel
prohibited even the delivery of humanitarian aid and basic foodstuffs. During its partial opening, the crossing
operated at reduced capacity, and the daily average of truckloads allowed into
the Gaza Strip was approximately 72 truckloads. 

 

Fuel

 

 Following the complete closure of Nahal Oz crossing, which
was used for the delivery of fuel supplies into the Gaza Strip, IOF opened Karm
Abu Salem crossing for the delivery of limited quantities of fuel that did not
meet the basic needs of the Gaza Strip’s civilian population. A fuel crisis emerged again and impacted
various aspects of life in the Gaza Strip. The operation of the Gaza Power Plant was stopped for several days due
to the lack of fuel and the plant is still operating at decreased capacity due
to the shortage of industrial fuel.[1] In addition, due to shortage of cooking gas,
several distribution stations were forced to shut down, and other stations were
congested with empty gas cylinders. The
quantities of cooking gas that were allowed into Gaza during the reporting
period were less than 35% of the actual daily civilian needs in cooking
gas. PCHR notes that large quantities of
benzene and diesel continued to enter the Gaza Strip via tunnels between Gaza
and Egypt, while cooking gas could not be entered via tunnels due to technical
constraints. 

 

The delivery of fuel to Gaza during the reporting period was as follows:

 

 IOF allowed the delivery of only 3,800 liters of
benzene. This quantity is not enough to
cover the Gaza Strip’s benzene needs for even a single day. It should be noted that before taking the
decision to reduce the quantities of fuel supplies in October 2007, Israel
permitted the delivery of 120,000 liters of benzene to the Gaza Strip
daily. 

 

 

 

 IOF allowed the delivery of 10,000 liters of
diesel to the Gaza Strip during the reporting period. This quantity is not enough to cover the Gaza
Strip’s actual diesel needs for a single day. Before the decision to reduce fuel supplies to Gaza, Israel permitted
the delivery of 350,000
liters
of diesel to Gaza daily.

 During the reporting period, the civilian population of the
Gaza Strip extremely suffered from a shortage of cooking gas resulting from the
total ban imposed by IOF on the delivery of cooking gas supplies to the Gaza
Strip for 14 days. IOF allowed very
limited quantities of cooking gas (5,200 tons, with a daily average of 118
tons) over the course of 30 days. This
amount represents 33.7% of the actual amount required by the populations of the
Gaza Strip. It should be noted that the inhabitants of the Gaza Strip need 350
tons of cooking gas daily. 

 IOF imposed a total ban on the delivery of industrial fuel,
which is used to operate the Gaza Power Plant, on 14 days. IOF opened Karm Abu Salem crossing for the
delivery of 7,000,000
liters
of industrial fuel to Gaza, a quantity that
sufficed to operate the Plant at 45% of its capacity during the reporting
period. It should be noted that the Gaza
Strip depends on three sources of power: the Gaza Power Plant, which provides
67-70 MW (34%); Israel, which provides 120 MW (58,5%); and Egypt, which provides
17.5 MW (7.5%).

 

· Sofa Crossing

 

IOF
completely closed Sofa crossing throughout the 44-day reporting period. No basic goods, including humanitarian aid
for UNRWA and the World Food Programme (WFP), were permitted to be imported
during the reporting period. 

 

In
addition, Israel banned the delivery of goods that had been allowed into Gaza
during the Tahdiya’ (lull in hostilities) between IOF and Palestinian armed
groups in the Gaza Strip, which entered into force on 19 June 2008, prior to
the tightening of the closure and the Israeli military offensive on Gaza that
began on 27 December 2008. These goods
included limited numbers of cattle, soft drinks, cement, metal pipes, gas
cylinders, wood, welding iron bars and textiles, all of which had been banned
for more than a year. 

 

 

 

Recommendations:

 

PCHR
calls upon the international community, particularly the High Contracting
Parties to the Fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian
Persons in Time of War, to:

 

1. Exert effective pressure on Israel to compel it to open all
of Gaza’s crossings, those used for commercial purposes and those used for
civilian movement, to allow the civilian population of the Gaza Strip to
reconstruct the civilian property that was destroyed during Israel’s latest
offensive on Gaza, and to enable them to enjoy their fundamental civil and
political rights, as well as their economic, social and cultural rights. 

2. Promptly and urgently intervene to open Rafah International
Crossing Point for those who wish to leave Gaza, including hundreds of patients
who require medical treatment abroad, students enrolled at universities abroad,
holders of residency permits in foreign countries, and other humanitarian
cases, and so those who are stranded in Egypt to return to Gaza if they wish. 

3. Promptly and urgently intervene to ensure respect for the
provisions of international humanitarian law and international human rights
law, in order to put an end to the deterioration of living conditions across
the Gaza Strip. 

4. Compel Israel to stop measures of collective punishment
against the civilian population of the Gaza Strip, including tightening the
closure of Gaza’s border crossings. 

5. Remind the State of Israel, the Occupying Power, of its
obligations towards the civilians of the Gaza Strip, under Article 55 of the
1949 Fourth Geneva Convention, which stipulates: "To the fullest extent of
the means available to it, the Occupying Power has the duty of ensuring the
food and medical supplies of the population; it should, in particular, bring in
the necessary foodstuffs, medical stores and other articles if the resources of
the occupied territory are inadequate. The Occupying Power may not requisition foodstuffs, articles or medical
supplies available in the occupied territory, and then only if the requirements
of the civilian population have been taken into account". The High Contracting Parties to the Fourth
Geneva Convention must fulfill their obligation under Article 1 of the
Convention, to ensure the implementation of convention’s provisions by the
State of Israel, in order to ensure the protection of the Palestinian civilians
of the Gaza Strip.  

 

 

 

 

————————————-

For more information, please contact the Palestinian
Centre for Human Rights at pchr@pchrgaza.org
or +972-(0)8-
282-4776.

 



[1] The
reduction of industrial fuel amounts permitted into the Gaza Strip caused the
Gaza Power Plant to operate at only 80% of its usual capacity; additional
factors forced it to operate at 50% of its capacity. For more details, see
“PCHR is Deeply Concerned over Continued Electrical Power Outage in the Gaza
Strip,” PCHR, Press Release, 28 January 2010.